Losing With Lyme Makes You A Winner!

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I grew up and still live in Connecticut, where Lyme disease was first discovered in 1975. I just recently heard through a cousin about a connection between lab experiments at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center in New York and Lyme, Connecticut. Smaranda Dumitru writes about the possible connection and the medical community’s attentively blind eye approach to this rampant disease, on the State University of New York at New Paltz’s website, Tick Talk.

Whether you believe in the Plum Island/Lyme disease connection or not, according to the CDC, over 300,000 people are diagnosed each year.

Even though I had heard of Lyme, Connecticut, and I had heard of Lyme disease, I was completely ignorant of what it can do to the human body until I contracted it.

Having Lyme disease has opened up my life to so many new discoveries about myself. One of the greatest discoveries is unlike that awful meal at your favorite restaurant or your idiotic ex-boyfriend, Lyme disease is a lasting, every changing relationship that never gives up on you!

It’s not all that dreadful–you really can benefit from having Lyme disease. Below are some of the positive losses that you can experience living with Lyme.

Hair loss

You can save a lot of money on hair coloring, cuts and shampoo.

Memory loss

Now, you really have an excuse for not sending in your child’s field trip money or why you didn’t reply to that birthday invitation!

Energy loss

Now, your spouse or partner can do all those mundane and annoying jobs like wash the windows and empty the cat box.

Job Loss

Yay! All your dreams about not dealing with unrealistic demands and crazy coworkers have come true!

Weight Loss

You can’t eat your favorite foods, but you sure look good in those jeans that used to be too tight!

 

Some other benefits of Lyme disease are you always get complimented on how well you look, even if you feel awful.

You have a bon-fide reason now to stay at home in your jammies and be lazy on the couch.

imagesYou turn into a little detective, honing your research skills to find new treatments, new doctors, new protocols, and new recipes to try.

You reach out to complete strangers for answers and information, willing to try even the most obscure of methods to ease your symptoms. And some of these strangers become new friends.

You really get to know your body and how it reacts to different compounds and foods.

And you find healthier ways to keep on living.

Yours in Lyme Adventures,

TWL

 

http://www.cdc.gov/lyme/stats/humancases.html

https://sites.newpaltz.edu/ticktalk/social-attitudes/story-by-smaranda-dumitru/

 

images from Google images

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8 thoughts on “Losing With Lyme Makes You A Winner!

  1. It is so strange to me how when I was a kid in the 80’s we never worried about ticks. I was all over the woods and grassy areas and never looked for a tick once. Now I check my kids every time we come in from outside. Have had two unnecessary freak outs/ doc visits over it and am paranoid beyond belief. I know that’s a bit much but it’s such an ” in your face” topic anymore. I applaud you on your blog and your attitude and love reading what you have to say. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you! I try to make my blog as enjoyable as I can…I don’t need to make people depressed or worried. And just like anything else, your attention to something is more pronounced if you or someone you know is impacted by it.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, I try to be funny or at least a little lighter in my posts…I can’t be sad with this illness! I hope you read some other posts of mine. I recommend Adventures in Kale, Kale Fail, and Chemistry. Thanks for stopping by!

      Like

  2. I guess you have a little Nancy
    Drew in ya too, huh? Great post by the way. Growing up in Connecticut myself, and having must of my family still there, I “thought” I knew so much about Lyme – but the more I read, the more confusing it gets. The conspiracy theories, though, still spark my interest. But prettyflyforawhitemom is right – growing up, this wasn’t a huge concern. Now it’s of epidemic proportions. Makes ya wonder.

    Like

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